I am questioning why merely living in a particular area make you effortlessly speak a certain way.

Por Francisca Sanchez lunes 29 de octubre, 2018

They evolve, but not genetically. It does seem like they’re fairly resilient, but as communications and transportation advance, I suspect the barriers between cultures will inevitably erode and accents along with them. She has had a superficial English accent by the time she’s been my classmate, coupled with an Indian accent in the background.

Turning south toward the Twin Cities you lose it again around Cambridge on 65 or a bit south of Hinckley on 35. There’s no real laws about how to speak any language, so the accent can be almost anything. New York City has borough accents, which natives can localize sometimes nearly to blocks. You almost instantly reach the same potential as the line, and from that point on no current flows.AC – sometimes. Originally Posted by spoonman Very interesting, still quite extraordinary how an accent can become so ‘set-in-stone’.

In the US it almost seems as though we have some quasi-deliberately separated accents: blacks and whites from the exact same geographical areas, especially in the former Confederacy, maintained distinguishable accents for generations. I think it’s safe to say that, in comparison with the USA, the UK and Ireland have a much greater diversity of accents across a considerably smaller geographical area. Jrmonroe, this is exactly my point. The accent is still there, but much less noticeable 30 years later–just enough for my wife and I to laugh at each other for speaking some words funny like “Caa” for “car,” or “Chedda” for “Chedder,” or “AreaR” for “area” (conservation of “Rs” principle) after talking to our relatives for an hour or so.

I don’t know. Similar explanation for European languages/culture. A first guess would be that Manchester and Liverpool have different cultural, especially emigration and immigration, histories, starting hundreds of years ago. I’d like to know what the pressures were that made this happen?

The US was settled by people who started with horses and moved on to steam trains. Imagine if this was not so (that is, if electrons would flow without needing a circuit) … as soon as a battery is made, electrons would simply pour out from one of its ends, like a bucket of water with a hole in it. The “Fargo” accent in Minnesota is not common in Duluth, but from Duluth heading west toward the Range you cross some kind of boundary and suddenly start hearing it. Fghf76, when you see the word circuit, it is buy essay writer
related to the word circle. Accents are completely influenced by culture and would fall under Dawkins “meme theory”. This is not an issue at 60Hz but can be an issue at higher frequencies. Now things are much different, people routine travel, have access to hundreds of national and international English speaking channels and at least half the radios run national programing. That’s what happened in the US.

I agree this probably plays a role, there’s also distinct dialects in France and Spain (or any country, for that matter), which someone who doesn’t speak the language, like me, are completely oblivious to. Maybe nobody knows the answer. Originally Posted by spoonman It’s not really analogous to skin colour and height though, these are physical changes and will be influenced, in some part, by genetics. I don’t think they are set in stone at all.

Originally Posted by JeffreyWhittaker Current flows because positive energy is stronger than negative energy! In order for change to occur there must be a past and a future (negative and positive).* Stop it.Go get an education. If they can’t return to the power supply, the current will not flow. I grew up in the Iron range of Minn. which has the accent that Iceaura mentions above.

Certainly, there are regional accents in the US, and these may be less apparent to someone from the UK and Ireland to whom they sound similar. They evolve, but not genetically. An easy place to hear that is in folk music recordings: compare blues singers and bluegrass singers from the SE US mountain regions.

Originally Posted by Lynx_Fox I don’t think they are set in stone at all. In high school I have met an Indian girl who has resided in London for a few years. Immigration and cultural history predict the boundaries. Related Discussions:Hi!Tree’s have free willHi Y’all Lets get some talk with Linguistics/Cognitive Science!Obsession with US issuesHi, I`m writer, author of A?Sex and RankA?What the deal with the Freemasons?Diatomaceous earth food grade is amazingHELLO!Computer Science jobs WorldwideNeed to explain this It remained because there were only solid TV station, (and 2 others mostly static), radio was still local, and people didn’t travel very far.

My friends from Boston complain vociferously about the Maine coast accents audible in some currently broadcast TV ads purportedly set near Boston (apparently even George Clooney’s attempt at a Boston fishing coast accent in “A Perfect Storm” was preferable to outright misrepresentation). They can speak English perfectly fine among themselves but not with Americans such as me. How does this happen? People acquire dialect as they acquire language.

Originally Posted by JeffreyWhittaker Current flows because positive energy is stronger than negative energy! In order for change to occur there must be a past and a future (negative and positive).* Well – no. For example where I was raised, in a small New England, fishing town there was a very strong “Down East” accent. The accent is still there, but much less noticeable 30 years later–just enough for my wife and I to laugh at each other for speaking some words funny like “Caa” for “car,” or “Chedda” for “Chedder,” or “AreaR” for “area” (conservation of “Rs” principle) after talking to our relatives for an hour or so.

Therefore no current flows. But it’s difficult to explain the distinct difference in accents between, e.g., Manchester and Liverpool when they’re 30 miles apart. I agree with your point about the UK and Ireland compared to the USA, but I don’t know the reason for the greater diversity.Also, I find the North American drawl an attractive feature but, again, I don’t know how it came about. In the same way that skin colour, height, etc. vary depending what part of the world you are from, your accent varies depending on which part of the country you have been living in.

Originally Posted by spoonman It’s not really analogous to skin colour and height though, these are physical changes and will be influenced, in some part, by genetics. Short Term Governments.Elections every six months.Make your Representative stand or fall on his/her six month Performance.Trusted Public Servants to Administer Daily/Monthly/Yearly on going Legislated Laws, Wages, Annual Leave, Superannuation, Collection of Legal Taxation, Energy Services Waste Disposal, Public Transport, Health Services, Ensure the Production of Goods and Services for Overseas Trade, Provide all Security, National and International, and ensure Educational Requirements are Operating Efficiently.Parliamentry Responsibilities would deal with any profiteering/corruption/Exploitation of a Nations Natural Resources, Overseas Alliances, and, in general, Peace and Harmony amongst the Population.I’m in favour of a Three Party System. I tend to drop pronouns when they are implicit. I’ve worked with people from India who speak English, but I cannot comprehend most of their speech due to their “extremely thick accent”.

Other than that, check out Foreign accent syndrome. Since there is a virtual ground between you and “real” ground due to your capacitance, some current can flow. Originally Posted by Theresa Why is the sound of your voice influenced by which country you live in? Many nationalities can be recognized by particular accents. Originally Posted by fghf76 I would like to ask:1.Is electricity travelling to the ground at the picture and if it is why are the circuits grounded(doesn’t it mean electricity is lost?)imgur: the simple image sharer (sorry I tried to upload picture directly but it fails every time)-In case it is not travelling to the ground – why it’s not?(ground is connected to the wire)2.When I touch electric line while I am isolated from the ground is some electricity still travelling through me from line?

Current flows because positive energy is stronger than negative energy! In order for change to occur there must be a past and a future (negative and positive).* In this sense, the current acts more like a so-called “serpentine belt” that powers various equipment on a car’s engine. Originally Posted by spoonman I think it’s safe to say that, in comparison with the USA, the UK and Ireland have a much greater diversity of accents across a considerably smaller geographical area. No one can say that “English” must be spoken this way or that way.

Actually, to paraphrase Pauli, that’s not even coherent enough to be wrong. For example: “Went to the store to buy oranges today, but got apples instead.” Occasionally, I’ll find myself adding a “t’ to the end of “across”. Your accent is not determined by which languages you are fluent in, but which country you’re from.

I’d like to know what the pressures were that made this happen? Ireland and Britain were settled by people who walked everywhere for thousands of years before finally moving up to horses. The regional accents seem to be disappearing to some extent, as people are more mobile and are less inclined to stay in the same area for their entire lives.

They evolve, but not genetically. In short, our capacity to transfer memes has increased over time, and accents were “fixed” in the British Isles at a much earlier point in history than was the case in the British Isles. I think it’s safe to say that, in comparison with the USA, the UK and Ireland have a much greater diversity of accents across a considerably smaller geographical area.

I think it’s safe to say that, in comparison with the USA, the UK and Ireland have a much greater diversity of accents across a considerably smaller geographical area. The South Side of Chicago (Illinois, USA) has a recognizable accent, which North Siders have no trouble distinguishing. For example where I was raised, in a small New England, fishing town there was a very strong “Down East” accent. Some of the diversity in the UK could probably be explained by historical disputes; the war with the Scots and the English for Scottish freedom, and the English invasion of Ireland would create social and cultural isolation between these populations.

There is always some of us who are simply accent-prone. Now things are much different, people routine travel, have access to hundreds of national and international English speaking channels and at least half the radios run national programing. Originally Posted by billvon There is no path from ground back to any other part of the circuit. Accents are completely influenced by culture and would fall under Dawkins “meme theory”.

That may be true. Accents are completely influenced by culture and would fall under Dawkins “meme theory”. It remained because there were only solid TV station, (and 2 others mostly static), radio was still local, and people didn’t travel very far. Originally Posted by Harold14370 Certainly, there are regional accents in the US, and these may be less apparent to someone from the UK and Ireland to whom they sound similar.

I’d like to know what the pressures were that made this happen? I’ve often wondered about accents. Languages are constantly evolving. In almost every kind of circuit, the electrons leave the source of power, travel around the circuit, and return to the power supply.

I am questioning why merely living in a particular area make you effortlessly speak a certain way. It’s not really analogous to skin colour and height though, these are physical changes and will be influenced, in some part, by genetics. An accent is not a meme or something that you learn like a language, it just happens naturally, and I wonder why this is even possible. I haven’t lived there in over 40 yrs, and have lost most of it, but their are still some hang overs. Good point (emphasis mine).

Very interesting, still quite extraordinary how an accent can become so ‘set-in-stone’.